The Mortal Sea

bolster

I just got back from a meeting of the Newmarket Historical Society. I was interested in hearing the lecture given tonight by  Jeff Bolster from UNH. His presentation  was about colonial shipping  in the Piscataqua region. He also  touched  on his new book “The Mortal Sea” and I had him sign my copy.

It’s a completely different perspective on the North Atlantic  and juxtaposed against the current news concerning the state of the fishery, most informative. Every fisherman should read this book especially those that sported those bumper stickers.

“NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE: DESTROYING FISHERMEN AND THEIR COMMUNITIES SINCE 1976,”

The ancients themselves with their crude methods and small boats were able to decimate fish populations. Clear cutting timber for ship building changed the landscape and the water quality. Timber mills and the mills that followed with their dams had significant and continuing effects on fish populations and water quality. In the 1700’s  they saw the  fish counts go way down.

There was a reason why it was named the Salmon Falls River, it once had a salmon run.

Jeff Bolster was just awarded the prestigious Bancroft Prize from Columbia University this week for “The Mortal Sea”

Here is a short video of Jeff discussing his latest and prize winning work. You should  head over to Water Street  Bookstore and buy it.

It’s a whole new way of thinking about and understanding the North Atlantic, spanning  centuries.

Mike

One comment

  1. Prof. Bolster is one of my favorites. Black Jacks was great, and the early portion of Mortal Sea promises more quality.

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